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Research unit positions
The Bio-organic Chemistry Laboratory at the IRCM invites applications from qualified individuals pursuing graduate and postdoctoral studies. Entry into M.Sc. and PhD programs is made through the Departments of Chemistry at the University of Montreal.
One or two graduate student positions available to study the role of T cell costimulatory molecules in immune regulation using knock-out, knock-in, and transgenic mice. There are three potential projects: 1) Dissection of signal transduction pathways to understand the synergistic effects of CD28 and ICOS, 2) Investigation of the molecular bases of memory vs. anergic T cells using phosphoflow and ChIP-chip technologies, 3) Searching for genes involved in regulatory T cell development using a medium-throughput screening protocol.
We seek to recruit a motivated student wishing to pursue graduate studies (M.Sc. or PhD) in the field of mRNA subcellular trafficking.

The Molecular Genetics and Development research unit seeks students wishing to pursue graduate studies.

 

Two (2) postdoctoral positions are available to study novel families of receptors and adaptors expressed in immune cells. The projects will be aimed at characterizing the roles and mechanisms of action of SLAM family receptors and SAP-related adaptors in T-cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. Approaches will include the study of various knock-out mice generated in our laboratory, and the dissection of immune cell signalling mechanisms through molecular approaches.
A postdoctoral position at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM) located in downtown Montreal, affiliated with Université de Montreal and closely linked to McGill University, is available immediately.

Research field: The role of chromatin in gene expression regulation

We are currently seeking exceptional postdoctoral candidates to join a multi-investigator
research team (laboratories of Drs. Cayouette, Charron, and Kania) studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuronal polarity in development and disease. The applicants should hold a Ph.D. and/or M.D. degree and have a strong track record in research in the field of neurobiology and/or cell biology, including at least one first author high-quality scientific publication. The selected candidates will work under the supervision of one of the principal investigator member of the team, but will also interact with the rest of the team on a regular basis. Positions will be held at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montreal (www.ircm.qc.ca/en).
We are looking for a student wishing to pursue graduate studies (M.Sc.) and who has an interest in working with an adult population with significant health problems such as cystic fibrosis.
We seek one or two motivated students wishing to pursue graduate studies (M.Sc. or PhD) in the research field of synapse development and plasticity in the brain.
The Molecular Genetics and Development research unit is seeking an animal health technician.
A postdoctoral position is available in the Laboratory of Human Retrovirology at the IRCM to study Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-host interactions governing HIV persistence. Research projects are particularly focused on understanding the role of HIV accessory proteins (Vpr, Vpu and Nef) in evading intrinsic/ innate immunity using cell-based and humanized mouse models (NSG or/and BLT). These research projects are funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). For more information on the research program of the Laboratory, please refer to the Research Unit’s website
We are looking to recruit 2 PhD and/or MSc students and one postdoctoral fellow interested by molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, physiology and energy metabolism.
The IRCM invites applications from outstanding and motivated students to join its Graduate Program in Molecular and Cellular Medicine (MCM). This innovative program, which leads to a Master’s (M.Sc.) or doctorate (PhD) degree, is designed to expose students to multidisciplinary training in molecular biology with a focus on cutting-edge technologies used in the context of basic and translational research. Stipend support is guaranteed for successful candidates.
 
The IRCM is a leading research institution in Canada and groups together 35 research teams. Located downtown Montréal, the IRCM provides a dynamic and internationally competitive research environment, and benefits from a unique setting where basic and clinical research both thrive.
Research field: The role of H2A.Z-mediated cryptic transcription in human cancers
The lab supervised by Dr. Frédéric Charron, at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM), is recruiting a bioinformatician.
The candidate can be a graduate student who will pursue his/her PhD in Dr. Charron’s laboratory (with the possibility of finding a co-supervisor), a postdoctoral fellow or an employee. PhD students can register at the Université de Montréal or McGill University.
Areas of research:
• Interventional ethics research in transitional care
• Autism and person-centered research ethics
Area of research: Vulnerability and mental health research ethics
The Molecular Genetics and Development research unit is seeking an animal health technician.
We are looking for a qualified individual interested in using molecular and genetic approaches to study nociceptive circuit development and function.
The Clinical Research Institute of Montreal (IRCM) is located in downtown Montreal. The IRCM features state-of-the-art research facilities and equipment.
One postdoctoral position is available to study gene regulation in hematopoiesis and leukemia by the epigenetic regulator “Growth factor independence 1” (Gfi1). This protein acts as a transcription factor and is key for normal blood development. Gfi1, and its homologue Gfi1b, repress chromatin regions by recruiting chromatin modifiers such as LSD1 and HDAC. We found that a human variant of GFI1, called Gfi136N, which is associated with myeloid leukemia, can induce epigenetic changes and accelerate development of myeloid leukemia in humans and mice. Our aim is to understand the mechanistic consequences of Gfi1 loss or mutation in blood cells using in-house cell lines, mouse models and human samples (for more information about our projects please visit our website: www.moroylab.org).
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